Saturday, August 28, 2010

An Interview With - Cheryl Morgan

"6. You have recently embarked on a new project, an e-publishing venture called Wizard’s Tower Press and Kevin is one of your business partners in that, isn’t he? Can you explain what Wizard’s Tower Press is all about?

It is a long story, but for complicated reasons involving travel to the USA I found myself needing to have a real business that involved going to conventions. Publishing seemed to be the obvious route to take, but I had no money to invest so I had to find some way to do it that didn’t involve potentially bankrupting myself. As a result I am getting involved in ebooks. Kevin, as always, is my sounding board, moral support, and detail-oriented nag, but I have many other fine people working for me as well, including Anne Gray who did such a wonderful job of fixing my grammar for Emerald City.

Mostly what we will be doing at Wizard’s Tower is finding books that are long out of print that the big publishers are not interested in, and making them available again as ebooks. I’m not expecting to grow a huge company, or discover the next William Gibson, or anything like that, but I do hope I can help out the many mid-list authors whose careers are stagnating because the publishers and bookstores are increasingly focused on best sellers."


4 out of 5

http://helenlowe.info/blog/2010/08/25/an-interview-with-cheryl-morgan/

An interview with - Elizabeth Hand

"Elizabeth Hand: Well, to me they never seemed all that transgressive, to tell you the truth. I was a tomboy as a kid—I was skinny and had cropped hair and was often mistaken for a boy—and up until I was about six I had my own very fluid ideas of gender in that I believed that, somehow, an individual could choose whether or not s/he wanted to be a boy or a girl. I identified more with boys than girls, so I assumed that eventually everything would sort itself out and I’d end up on that side of the bullpen. I was pretty bummed out when I realized I was stuck being a girl. I was like Anybody’s in West Side Story. I wanted to be tough. When we lived in Yonkers in a neighborhood full of kids, I was always getting into fights with boys and coming home with a black eye. I was provoking fights with boys. I liked fighting, even though I always got decked. I should have gone into Roller Derby."


4 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2010/08/an-interview-with-elizabeth-hand

Spotlight on - Charlie Jane Anders

"How did you get involved with science fiction blog i09? How has becoming an influential blogger changed your relationship to the field?
Annalee Newitz and I were putting out other magazine, a print magazine whose theme was not having a theme, for five years from 2002 to 2007. We published people like Rudy Rucker and Terry Bisson, along with articles about human rights for clones and 21st century eugenics programs. We organized weird events to raise money for it, like our Ballerina Pie Fight. Annalee and I also co-edited a book of essays by female geeks called She’s Such A Geek!, which came out in 2007. So when Gawker approached Annalee to launch a blog about science fiction and science, she thought of including me, which I’m incredibly grateful for. "


3.5 out of 5

http://www.locusmag.com/Perspectives/2010/08/spotlight-on-charlie-jane-anders-author-editor-blogger-emcee/

Interview with author of Werewolves - Paul Jessup

"Can you remember the first time you became aware of werewolves? Tell me about that first encounter.
When I was a kid my Aunt Darlene used to tell me stories that would scare me senseless. She was only seven years older than I was, so she was more like an older sister than an aunt. One time she told me this grisly story about a boy my age being bitten by a werewolf, and he would hunt around looking for little kids to eat. That story scared me so bad I didn’t sleep that night. I kept swearing I heard him outside of my bedroom window, howling. Prowling. Wanting to eat me."



4 out of 5

http://suvudu.com/2010/08/interview-with-paul-jessup-author-werewolves.html

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The Barrens 3 - F. Paul Wilson

Old flame's Miskatonic Jersey hillbilly transformation.


4 out of 5

http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/starshipsofa/StarShipSofa_Aural_Delights_150_Paul_Di_Filippo.mp3

The Lucky Strike - Kim Stanley Robinson

The Lucky Strike - Kim Stanley Robinson
Japan nuke near miss punishment.


4.5 out of 5

http://www.webscription.net/chapters/1597801844/1597801844___5.htm

Black Air - Kim Stanley Robinson

Black Air - Kim Stanley Robinson
Can't walk on water, Saint Anna.


3 out of 5

http://www.webscription.net/chapters/1597801844/1597801844___4.htm

Ridge Running - Kim Stanley Robinson

Mountain goat maniacs.


3 out of 5

http://www.webscription.net/chapters/1597801844/1597801844___2.htm

Venice Drowned - Kim Stanley Robinson

Venice Drowned - Kim Stanley Robinson
Underwater recovery deal.


4 out of 5

http://www.webscription.net/chapters/1597801844/1597801844___1.htm

Occultation - Laird Barron

The Something Scary game. Now with giant turtles, worms and spiders.


4 out of 5

http://www.webscription.net/chapters/1597801925/1597801925___3.htm

The Forest - Laird Barron

The Forest - Laird Barron
Dying of cancer won't bug me, at least until the sun goes out, anyway.


4.5 out of 5

http://www.webscription.net/chapters/1597801925/1597801925___2.htm

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

The Barrens 2 - F. Paul Wilson

Old flame's Miskatonic Jersey hillbilly transformation.


4 out of 5

http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/starshipsofa/StarShipSofa_Aural_Delights_No_149_Adam_Troy_Castro.mp34

Monday, August 23, 2010

SF Interview With - Gord Sellar

"Q1. As a Canadian, you has lived teaching English literature in a korean univ. over 7 years and also written Science Fiction. I heard You had been nominated in John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 2009 Worldcon. Would you explain briefly about your nominated title?



Yes, I'm Canadian and I've been in Korea since December 2001--actually, it was right at the end of the month, I think I arrived on December 30th 2001. So at the end of December 2010, I'll have been in Korea for eight years!

I had the honor of being nominated for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 2009. That nomination wasn't on the basis of any particular story, but rather on the basis of everything I'd published until then as a "new writer." I suspect that it was mostly my two stories in Asimov's Science Fiction that got me nominated, since the other places I'd published stories were, I think, less widely read by voters at the time. The less famous of those two stories ("Dhuluma No More") is forthcoming in Korean translation in Futurscope, the "mook magazine" which will soon be put out by the Seoul SF&F Library as I understand it."


4 out of 5

http://efremov.blog.me/100111660204

Sunday, August 22, 2010

How Edgar Rice Burroughs became one of the twentieth century's biggest scifi authors - John Marr

"But even without sex, swordplay isn't the hottest thing on Mars. Outside the polar regions, everyone runs around essentially naked. The universal Martian costume is the "harness," an arrangement of straps and belts designed for little more than supporting weapons and ornaments. While Martian women may be oviparous, Burroughs makes clear that they can easily pass for fully equipped mammals. So scanty is Martian dress that even steamy illustrations by Boris Vallejo and Frank Frazetta (see above) are more modest than the real thing."


4 out of 5

http://io9.com/5616081/how-edgar-rice-burroughs-became-one-of-the-twentieth-centurys-biggest-scifi-authors

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Or We Will All Hang Separately - Nancy Jane Moore

Skills upload space rebuild.


4 out of 5


http://futurismic.com/2010/08/02/new-fiction-or-we-will-all-hang-separately-by-nancy-jane-moore/

Monday, August 16, 2010

What Makes A River - Deborah Coates

Not Placid.


3 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/stories/2010/08/what-makes-a-river

Sunday, August 15, 2010

Divided By Infinity - Robert Charles Wilson

Divided By Infinity - Robert Charles Wilson
Book fake reasoning stupidity blast.


4 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/stories/2010/08/divided-by-infinity

Queering SFF: An Interview with Editor - Steve Berman

"One of the things this series of posts has dealt with in the past is how hard it can be sometimes to find queer speculative fiction, especially when the big presses seem to actively avoid “outing” their books in flap copy. The endless search doesn’t have to be the default for readers seeking queer SFF, though, because there are other offerings. Several small presses are doing great work with queer SFF—and they aren’t interested in hiding it. For a reader who’s used to the difficult hunt for books they want, it’s a breath of fresh air to discover a press that will provide you with your LGBTQ spec-fic happily, openly, and with passion."


4 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2010/08/queering-sff-an-interview-with-editor-steve-berman

The Fermi Paradox Is Our Business Model - Charlie Jane Anders

Just a million year exploitation job.


3.5 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/stories/2010/08/the-fermi-paradox-is-our-business-model

Robert A. Heinlein: The Tor.com Blog Symposium - Patrick Nielsen Hayden

An introduction piece - there are a whole bunch of followups :- and this ha links to them.

"On August 17, Tor Books will publish the first half of William H. Patterson Jr.’s two-volume authorized biography of Robert A. Heinlein, Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century: Volume 1, 1907-1948: Learning Curve. In commemoration of this, we’ve convened a kind of online panel discussion of Heinlein and of the biography—of his work, his methods, and his legacy, and of what light the biography sheds on all of those.

Kicking things off will be longtime fan, Heinlein reader, and tech-industry journalist Mitch Wagner, followed by award-winning novelist (Tooth and Claw; Farthing) and prolific Tor.com blogger Jo Walton. Over the next several days, possibly as soon as today, we’ll also be hearing from John Scalzi (author of Old Man’s War and several other SF novels), Pamela Dean (author of Tam Lin and the Secret Country trilogy, and several other works of fantasy), Charles Stross (author of Halting State, the Merchant Princes series, and the Laundry series), and Sarah Hoyt (author of Ill Met by Moonlight, Death of a Musketeer, Draw One in the Dark, and many other works of SF, fantasy, and historical romance)."


3.5 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2010/08/robert-a-heinlein-the-torcom-blog-symposium

Lightspeed 02 - John Joseph Adams

The same average as the last issue, but this time in the form of three average and one very good. Several non-fiction pieces again, touching on time travel and airships for example - elements of the couple of the stories.

Lightspeed 2 : No Time Like the Present - Carol Emshwiller
Lightspeed 2 : Manumission - Tobias S. Buckell
Lightspeed 2 : The Zeppelin Conductors' Society Annual Gentlemen's Ball - Genevieve Valentine
Lightspeed 2 : for a single yesterday - George R. R. Martin

Much cheaper in the past.

3 out of 5


Flatbread memory takeout departure.

4 out of 5


Long accomodation.

3 out of 5


Time trip drug user.

3 out of 5




3 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/issue/july-2010-issue-2/

For A Single Yesterday - George R. R. Martin

Time trip drug user.


3 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/for-a-single-yesterday/

The Zeppelin Conductors' Society Annual Gentlemen's Ball - Genevieve Valentine

Long accomodation.


3 out of 5


.http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/the-zeppelin-conductors-society-annual-gentlemens-ball/

No Time Like the Present - Carol Emshwiller

Much cheaper in the past.


3 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/no-time-like-the-present/

Lightspeed 1 - John Joseph Adams

A reasonable start with two 3's and two 3.5's and some non-fiction.

Lightspeed 1 : I'm Alive I Love You I'll See You in Reno - Vylar Kaftan
Lightspeed 1 : The Cassandra Project - Jack McDevitt
Lightspeed 1 : Cats in Victory - David Barr Kirtley
Lightspeed 1 : Amaryllis - Carrie Vaughn

Missed connections.

3 out of 5


Alien bad news hid.

3 out of 5


Monkeyman, dogmen moggie incarnation.

3.5 out of 5


Getting a banner kid.

3.5 out of 5




3.5 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/issue/june-2010-issue-1/

Amaryllis - Carrie Vaughn

Getting a banner kid.


3.5 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/amaryllis/

Cats In Victory - David Barr Kirtley

Monkeyman, dogmen moggie incarnation.


3.5 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/cats-in-victory/

The Cassandra Project - Jack McDevitt

Alien bad news hid.


3 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/the-cassandra-project/

I'm Alive I Love You I'll See You In Reno - Vylar Kaftan

Missed connections.


3 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/im-alive-i-love-you/

Clarkesworld 47 - Sean Wallace

Clearly one of the worst issues so far. Nothing of interest in any of it.

Clarkesworld 47 : Thirteen Ways of Looking at Space/Time - Catherynne M. Valente
Clarkesworld 47 : Messenger - Julia M Sidorova

The Other Side.

2 out of 5


In the beginning was too far from the end.

2.5 out of 5



1 out of 5

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/issue_47

The Messenger - Julia M. Sidorova

The Other Side.


2 out of 5

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/sidorova_08_10/

Thirteen Ways Of Looking At Space/time - Catherynne M. Valente

In the beginning was too far from the end.


2.5 out of 5

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/valente_08_10/

Clarkesworld 46 - Sean Wallace

An interesting article on keeping a closed ecosystem going with a view to space travel.

Good to see stuff like the Kanakia, too.

Clarkesworld 46 : Beach Blanket Spaceship - Sandra McDonald
Clarkesworld 46 : The Association of the Dead - Rahul Kanakia

Vee-Real, Pops.

3 out of 5


Code Song sumith.

3.5 out of 5



3.5 out of 5

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/kanakia_07_10/

The Association Of The Dead - Raul Kanakia

Code Song sumith.


3.5 out of 5


http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/kanakia_07_10/

Beach Blanket Spaceship - Sandra McDonald

Vee-Real, Pops.


3 out of 5

http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/mcdonald_07_10/

Apex Magazine 15 - Jason Sizemore

Nothing makes it above ordinary here.

Apex Magazine 15 : Fair Ladies - Theodora Goss
Apex Magazine 15 : Four Is Me! With Squeeeeee! - Nick Mamatas
Apex Magazine 15 : Secret Life - Jeff VanderMeer

Back to Malo.

3 out of 5


State of ruin.

2 out of 5


Cleaning out the shadow chamber.

3 out of 5



2 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/

Four Is Me! With Squeeeeee! And LOLer! - Nick Mamatas

State of ruin.


2 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/08/short-story-four-is-me-with-squeeeeee-and-loler-by-nick-mamatas/

Fair Ladies - Theodora Goss

Back to Malo.


3 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/08/short-story-fair-ladies-by-theodora-goss/

Apex Magazine 14 - Jason Sizemore

Nothing of interest here except the Sanford - apart from the fact that the last is styled as a puzzle, so may be a bit of fun.

Apex Magazine 14 : Apex Magazine 14 - Jason Sizemore
Apex Magazine 14 : Artifact - Peter Atwood
Apex Magazine 14 : Shrödinger's Pussy - Terra LeMay
Apex Magazine 14 : Here We Are Falling Through Shadows - Jason Sanford
Apex Magazine 14 : Those Below - Jeremy C. Shipp
Apex Magazine 14 : End of the Line: A Puzzle - Susannah Mandel

Kid memory maker machine.

3 out of 5


Love problem.

2 out of 5


Ripper family, not.

3.5 out of 5


Remade girl brains.

3 out of 5


Alien door test.

3 out of 5



2 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/archive/

End Of The Line: A Puzzle - Susannah Mandel

Alien door test.


3 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/07/short-story-end-of-the-line-a-puzzle-reprint-by-susannah-mandel/

Those Below - Jeremy C. Shipp

Remade girl brains.


3 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/07/short-story-those-below-reprint-by-jeremy-c-shipp/

Shrodinger's Pussy - Terra LeMay

Love problem.


2 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/07/short-story-shrodingers-pussy-by-terra-lemay/

Jack the Wonderful Williamson 2 - Frederik Pohl

"I did by chance run into Jack Williamson, briefly, at the first-ever Worldcon in 1939, which was in the same summer as New York’s first World’s Fair — and which Donald Wollheim had proposed we New York fans should use as the opportunity to convene a World Science Fiction Convention in the hope that it would attract some foreign fans who would be coming to our city for the Fair anyway. Mark the fact that the original idea had come from a Futurian."


3.5 out of 5

http://www.thewaythefutureblogs.com/2010/08/jack-williamson-2/

Jack the Wonderful Williamson 1 - Frederik Pohl

"My dear friend Jack Williamson, who died a few years ago, was ten or eleven years older than I, and I didn’t actually meet him — in the flesh, that is, though I certainly knew and revered him through his wonderful stories — until he was an elderly 30 and I was 19, and just beginning a life of my own. Jack, of course, had been living his own life for a decade or more, and an interesting life it was: coming to New Mexico in a covered wagon as a child., sailing down the Mississippi with another writer , finding the love of his life when they were kids — and then losing her — and finding her again when she became widowed. But as I wasn’t there for those busy times I can’t tell you about them."


3.5 out of 5

http://www.thewaythefutureblogs.com/2010/08/jack-the-wonderful-williamson-part-1-of-many/

Robert E. Howard: Anatomy of a Creative Crisis - William Patrick Maynard

"“Beyond the Sunrise” is the unofficial title afforded an unfinished Kull story that did not see print until over forty years after the author’s death. Its significance is due largely to the fact that it was the first of four widely differing attempts to continue the Kull series following the publication of both “The Shadow Kingdom” and “The Mirrors of Tuzun Thune” in Weird Tales in 1929."


4 out of 5

http://www.blackgate.com/2010/08/13/robert-e-howard-anatomy-of-a-creative-crisis/

Patient Zero - Tananarive Due

Immune boy runs out of caretakers.


4.5 out of 5

http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/patient-zero/

Unexpected Outcomes - Tim Pratt

Simulation service reduction.

3.5 out of 5


http://traffic.libsyn.com/escapepod/EP251_UnexpectedOutcomes.mp3

The Barrens 1 - F. Paul Wilson

Old flame's Miskatonic Jersey hillbilly transformation.


4 out of 5

http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/starshipsofa/StarShipSofa_Aural_Delights_No_148_Lucius_Shepard.mp3

Artifact - Peter Atwood

Kid memory maker machine.


3 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/07/short-story-artifact-by-peter-atwood/

Here We Are Falling Through Shadows - Jason Sanford

Ripper family, not.


3.5 out of 5

http://www.apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/07/short-story-here-we-are-falling-through-shadows-reprint-by-jason-sanford/

Friday, August 13, 2010

Apex Magazine 14 - Jason Sizemore

A very mixed bag with one very good story by Jeff Carlson.

Apex Magazine 13 : Laika's Dream - Holly Hight
Apex Magazine 13 : Sol Asleep - Naomi Libicki
Apex Magazine 13 : Long Eyes - Jeff Carlson
Apex Magazine 13 : The Thing in the Refrigerator That Could Stop Time - Matthew Kressel

Dead energy test.

2.5 out of 5


Coffin space bribe.

3 out of 5


The Ship Who Searched, and found ratpeople.

4 out of 5


Dick cord chord mistake.

2 out of 5



2 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/archive/

Sol Asleep - Naomi Libicki

Coffin space bribe.


3 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/06/short-fiction-sol-asleep-by-naomi-libicki/

Laika's Dream - Holly Hight

Dead energy test.


2.5 out of 5

http://apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/06/short-fiction-laikas-dream-by-holly-hight/

Long Eyes - Jeff Carlson

The Ship Who Searched, and found ratpeople.


4 out of 5

http://www.apexbookcompany.com/apex-online/2010/06/short-fiction-long-eyes-by-jeff-carlson

MIND MELD: Comics For Science Fiction Fans - J. P. Frantz

"Many people who read science fiction also read comic books, but not all and that's a shame. There are a lot of really good comics out there that are worth the time to read. To find out which ones, we asked our panelists this question:
Q: Comic books have be garnering more public attention in recent years due to the massive popularity of many superhero based based films. And while superhero comics and science fiction are kindred genres, not every SF fan has read a comic. What comics should a science fiction fan read?"


4 out of 5


http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2010/08/mind-meld-comics-for-science-fiction-fans/

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Robert E. Howard: The Sword Collector and His Poetry - Barbara Barrett

"Battles were fought and won based on the strength and keenness of blades as well as the ability to use them effectively. Bob Howard was not only interested in the various types of swords, he was also fascinated with the history they represented. In his poetry and his stories, he uses his knowledge of weapons, historical people, places and events to give us vivid images of those ages. "


4 out of 5

http://www.blackgate.com/2010/08/09/robert-e-howard-the-sword-collector-and-his-poetry/

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Editor of Masked Talks Superhero Fiction - Lou Anders

"As editor, what were you looking for in these stories?
What I wasn’t looking for, and has been done already, is an outsiders, ironic take on superheroes. I didn’t want stories that poked fun at the genre with a wink and a nudge. I wanted stories that would be recognizable and appealing to today’s sophisticated reader of contemporary comic book tales. For that I turned to writers who actually write comic books – 10 of the 15 contributors are working comics writers – as well as some of the top SF authors in the field."


3 out of 5


http://suvudu.com/2010/07/lou-anders-editor-of-masked-talks-superhero-fiction.html

The Secret to Writing Is Writing: A Conversation with - John Langan

"Beyond such a fortunate coincidence, however, the appearance of academic characters in weird narratives seems to me to serve a couple of ends. There’s the obvious device of furthering the plot in terms of exposition of crucial information. There’s also the less obvious — I’d almost call it a symptom of the weird narrative’s vexed relationship to knowledge. As I see it, weird fiction is shot through with a deep ambivalence about human knowledge, which may well encode a kind of skepticism towards the Enlightenment’s general faith in rationality. After all, the figures of learning in these narratives are just as likely to unleash the supernatural threat as they are to contain or expel it. The anxiety over epistemology that lies at the heart of what may be my favorite Lovecraft story, “The Call of Cthulhu,” is something that the academy has been struggling with for the better part of the last four or five decades, in the wake of Derrida, Foucault, Lacan, Deleuze, etc. So it’s another level of convergence that I’m only too happy to exploit."


4 out of 5

http://www.demonmuse.com/the-secret-to-writing-is-writing-a-conversation-with-john-langan/

Author Fields Your Questions! - Alastair Reynolds

"My question for the author would be: The Absence is interesting, and bringing up star dams, I figured that somebody or something had managed to just put Dyson spheres around all the stars, on their way to being a Kardashev type III after having perfected type II. The fact that opening a wormhole could do that… Well, quantum mechanics being what it is, possibly. My only complaint when I first thought about it was, what about the gravity waves? Yes, I know, it’s science fiction Bryan! Of course, on second reflection, I guess the Absence will go away once our two galaxies merge 4.5 billion years in the future.”

AR: Thanks – glad the ending worked for you. I don’t think it’s any great confession to say that I struggle with endings, especially at novel length. They’re very hard to judge; by the time I’m done with book I’m so invested in it that I have zero objectivity at that point, and the same goes for anyone else involved in the editing/production. I’ve taken stuff out of endings because I felt they were too drawn out, and then got stick for being too abrupt. And I’m constantly tinkering with the degree of closure. Personally I don’t like things too neat and tidy; I’m always happy to accept a degree of ambiguity as a reader. "


4 out of 5

http://josephmallozzi.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/july-29-2010-author-alastair-reynolds-fields-your-questions/

The Cage - A. M. Dellamonica

Werewolf trial.


3 out of 5

http://www.tor.com/stories/2010/07/the-cage

The Cold Commands Draft Excerpt - Richard Morgan

"“You really killed one of these beasts?” She was watching him keenly now, he knew. “With that blade you carry? Now that is remarkable.”

“I suppose so. As I said, I did have help.”

“Even so. Are you not proud?”

Ringil grimaced. “If you’d seen some of the other things I’ve done with this blade, you’d perhaps be less enamoured of my feats.”

“And perhaps not.”

Was she rubbing herself against him at the hip? Ringil turned to face her, met her eyes, caught the gleam of saliva on the teeth in her grin.

“My lady, I don’t quite know how to put this to you gently, so I won’t try. You are wasting your time with me.”

“Am I?” The grin was still there. “That’s a hasty judgment.”

Ringil sighed, pressed thumb and forefinger to his eyes. Was he really going to have to fuck this mad-woman before they made port."


4.5 out of 5

http://www.richardkmorgan.com/news/654/when-the-wip-comes-down/

The Parachute - Shelly Li

Retrograde boy view.


3 out of 5

http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/node/3595/full

Sunday, August 08, 2010

Interview: talks about The Windup Girl - Paolo Bacigalupi

"In many ways, though, it's not just a science-fiction novel, right? Most of the technology you describe, at least in terms of non-biological technology, is older than what we have now.
Yeah, it's more like throwback technologies. When I say science fiction, I think of classic Foundation, I think of rocket ships. But there's this other tradition of science fiction, which is sort of the stealth version. It's the stuff you see with Aldous Huxley or George Orwell, where you're extrapolating about who are we, where are we going, what our society looks like, and I feel very connected to that strain of science-fiction writing."


3.5 out of 5

http://thephoenix.com/Boston/arts/106214-interview-paolo-bacigalupi-talks-about-the-windup/?page=1#TOPCONTENT

Friday, August 06, 2010

Friday's Drive-By - Jason Nahrung

"Jason Nahrung is the other half of an Aussie spec-fic writing duo – the other half is Kirstyn McDermott. I’d love to say that, as a duo, they dress up at night and fight crime, but it would be (a) a little too personal, and (b) untrue. Realistically, they’re more likely to be fomenting some form of awe-inspiring, jaw-droppingly brilliant apocalyptic fiction. He is also the possessor of one of the most beautiful covers in the world, for The Darkness Within."


3.5 out of 5

http://angelaslatter.com/2010/08/06/fridays-drive-by-jason-nahrung/

Thursday, August 05, 2010

Impaler 1 - Kate Paulk

"dead, and seven still living though wounded so severely they would not see the morrow. I stalked to the nearest, rested the point my sword in the hollow of the man's throat. He took time to recognize my presence, to look up along the length of Toledo steel to my blood-covered face. A moan escaped him, and the words, "Kaziklu Bey." I smiled. The Impaler Lord. He recognized me: good. "Grant me reason not to impale you alive," I said in Turkish. His eyes opened very wide, and he grew even paler. His words lacked coherence, and were interspersed with pleas to Allah, but they told me enough. This group had been sent to commit murder and return to my beloved cousin with my corpse -- or failing that, my head. Returning without proof of my death had not been an option. How fitting that dear Basarab Laiota should choose the coward's path. No doubt he wished to be free of me so he could rest his old bones safely. Perhaps instead of sending his head to the Turks I should send that part of a man they valued most. My mood must have reflected upon my face, for the Turkish soldier began to beg the mercy I had implicitly promised. I regarded him with contempt. "May your Al-lah grant you mercy," I said, and drove my sword into his throat."


3.5 out of 5

http://www.nakedreader.com/preview.html